Build your own Manometer for Throttle Body Sync!

FIZZER6

The Angry Blue Mantis
Why spend $100-$150 for a piece of equipment that can be built for $20 in parts and an hour?

BUILD YOUR OWN MANOMETER FOR THROTTLE BODY SYNCHRONIZATION! :rockon:

I saw a few pictures on other bike forums of a couple homemade manometers, realized how simple it really was and successfully attempted it myself. You can too!


To Build the Manometer you will need:

Qt. Part # / Description

(4) Dorman 47311 Vacuum restrictors (3/16") - I found these at www.rockauto.com and most autopart stores carry these as well.

(2) Dorman 47356 Vacuum "F" connectors (3/16") - I found these at http://rockauto.com/dbphp/prt,42,47356

25' 1/4" O.D. x 0.17" I.D. clear vinyl tubing

(1) 1"x4"x24" clean board (for mounting the assembly to)

(16) zip-ties (4" long should be adequate)

(1) Hook/hanger to hang the assembly vertically


Tools needed:

Drill
Scissors
Marker
Straight edge


CONSTRUCTION
:

1. Lay out your 1"x4" board and draw a series of lines across it using the straight edge...they need to be as square as possible with the base of the board...I recommend using a builder's square to create the lines. 1/2" apart should be ideal although as you will find later...the lines don't help much because you don't need much precision!


2. Use a 3/4" piece of the hose to connect the 2 "F" connectors into a 4-point manifold


3. Cut your hose into 4-equal length sections around 6' in length each. Attach 3 of the hoses to the manifold, leaving one of the end hoses off for now


4. Lay the manifold on the board and mark spots on either side of the center portion that you will drill in order to fasten the manifold with zip-ties.




You will want the hoses to run straight with the board, you can eye-ball it or use the straight edge. Connect them to the board about every 8-10" as shown. It is important not to crush the hose much when using the zip ties over it as shown here:
 
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FIZZER6

The Angry Blue Mantis
5. When you have attached the 3 hoses you should have something like this:


6. Now stick one end of the 4th hose in a container of 2-stroke oil or ATF fluid and suck up 24-32" of fluid.


Be careful as you withdraw the hose not to release suction until you have the wet end of the hose elevated, this will hold the fluid in the hose.


7. Now, attach the 4th hose to the manifold and elevate it to let the fluid drain into the manifold. It will find it's way into all 4 hoses.
 

FIZZER6

The Angry Blue Mantis
8. Your completed manometer should look something like this, fluid should be leveled out after a few hours and 6-8" of fluid in each hose.


9. If you have not already done so, attach the 4 vacuum restrictors to the ends of the 4 hoses.


YOU HAVE BUILT YOUR MANOMETER!!!
 

FIZZER6

The Angry Blue Mantis
NOW ON TO THE FUN PART!

SYNCHRONIZING YOUR THROTTLE BODIES!

On to the FZ6:

1. Take off the seat

2. Remove the 2 hex drive bolts that hold the tank to the triple tree

3. Remove the rear tank through bolt:


4. Pull the tank toward the rear of the bike and up to clear the front fairings. Reinstall the rear tank pivot bolt and elevate the tank:


5. Locate the 4 throttle body (TB) hoses, 2 on each side. They are located along the inside of the frame, you will have to feel around to find them. Pull them out as much as possible:


6. remove the hose plugs from the TB hoses, being careful not to damage them! Next, install your manometer hoses into the bike hoses by way of your vacuum restrictors:

On each side of the bike one hose has a pink/purple mark(ring) on it. On the left side of the bike the marked hose is TB #1. On the right side of the bike the marked hose is TB #4. It should be obvious what that makes the other 2 hoses on each side. (2 & 3, respectively).
 
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FIZZER6

The Angry Blue Mantis
7. Set the manometer on a level surface or hang it with the hook, level. EDIT: From experience, it is best to warm the bike up to operating temp BEFORE connecting the manometer hoses, this prevents the fluid in the tubes from surging as much when you initially start the bike. Once your hoses are all connected correctly...start the bike. Do not rev it up! The fluid will start bouncing around in the manometer...it may look something like this at first:



8. Let the bike idle and reach operating temp...then re-check levels...my TB's were WAY off!!!! :eek:


9. slowly turn the adjusting screws for the corresponding tube to bring the levels together...DO NOT turn the #1 screw. Adjust #2-#4 to match the #1 tube ONLY!
Here are the screws you are turning. Note, #1 is the top, left screw...do not touch this one!


Here is my progression of adjusting:





10. Once you are happy with the levels that they are close to each other...slowly rev the bike to 4,000 rpms and hold the revs there until the levels change and steady up...keep track of which tubes were higher and adjust them down just slightly. What you are looking for is a balance of levels at idle to level at 4,000 rpms...it won't be perfect. It will help to rev the motor to 4,000 rpms after each adjustment you make...and let the levels on the manometer stabilize for 30 seconds before making the next adjustment.

11. ADJUST THE IDLE TO 1350 RPM! There is a large adjusting screw on the left side of the throttle body adjusting plate. Once you change the idle the TB levels will go crazy...let them stabilize and do the sync once again.
This is the idle adjustment screw, it can actually be turned with your fingers.


After final adjustment I ended up with something like this at idle:

Note that I left #4 low...that is because my #4 would creep up more than the others at 4,000 rpms...so this is a happy balance.

12. Turn off the engine, remove your hoses, reinstall the plugs on the bike's hoses, reassemble the bike and take a test ride!

My bike was MUCH smoother at all rpms and the annoying buzz from 6-7K rpms was significantly decreased!
 
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Nelly

International Liaison
Super Moderator
Elite Member
7. Set the manometer on a level surface or hang it with the hook, level. Once your hoses are all connected correctly...start the bike. Do not rev it up! The fluid will start bouncing around in the manometer...it may look something like this at first:



8. Let the bike idle and reach operating temp...then re-check levels...my TB's were WAY off!!!! :eek:


9. slowly turn the adjusting screws for the corresponding tube to bring the levels together...DO NOT turn the #1 screw. Adjust #2-#4 to match the #1 tube ONLY!
Here are the screws you are turning. Note, #1 is the top, left screw...do not touch this one!


Here is my progression of adjusting:





10. Once you are happy with the levels that they are close to each other...slowly rev the bike to 4,000 rpms and hold the revs there until the levels change and steady up...keep track of which tubes were higher and adjust them down just slightly. What you are looking for is a balance of levels at idle to level at 4,000 rpms...it won't be perfect.

11. ADJUST THE IDLE TO 1350 RPM! There is a large adjusting screw on the left side of the throttle body adjusting plate. Once you change the idle the TB levels will go crazy...let them stabilize and to the sync once again.
This is the idle adjustment screw, it can actually be turned with your fingers.


After final adjustment I ended up with something like this at idle:

Note that I left #4 low...that is because my #4 would creep up more than the others at 4,000 rpms...so this is a happy balance.

12. Turn off the engine, remove your hoses, reinstall the plugs on the bike's hoses, reassemble the bike and take a test ride!

My bike was MUCH smoother at all rpms and the annoying buzz from 6-7K rpms was significantly decreased!
Have to spread rep before you get it again. I might make this. The only thing that I will find tricky to source is the black manifold connections.
Where did you get yours from?
Also the how to balance the TB's was written very simply and I appreciate that.

Nelly
 

FIZZER6

The Angry Blue Mantis
Have to spread rep before you get it again. I might make this. The only thing that I will find tricky to source is the black manifold connections.
Where did you get yours from?
Also the how to balance the TB's was written very simply and I appreciate that.

Nelly
I found the black F connectors (Dorman 47356) and the Vacuum restrictors (Dorman 47311) from RockAuto Auto Parts And they shipped FAST! :thumbup:
Depending on your country you may just have to do a Google search for the part numbers...that's how I found Rock Auto had them.
 

DownrangeFuture

Electronic Repair Genius
Props on building this. I couldn't find the "F" conncetors anywhere. I would have had to buy them online.

I would have just linked to the one on the R1-forum, since it's the exact same as the one there. It's a good write-up though. I like his avatar better though. :D
 

FIZZER6

The Angry Blue Mantis
Props on building this. I couldn't find the "F" conncetors anywhere. I would have had to buy them online.

I would have just linked to the one on the R1-forum, since it's the exact same as the one there. It's a good write-up though. I like his avatar better though. :D
I saw that writeup..gave me some good ideas...but he didn't have 30+ pictures! :BLAA:

I ordered the F-connectors online...cost about $10 and arrived in 5 days. Beats spending $130 on a manometer. Autozone/Advance/PepBoys/Napa all carry the vacuum restrictors.
 

Nelly

International Liaison
Super Moderator
Elite Member
I found the black F connectors (Dorman 47356) and the Vacuum restrictors (Dorman 47311) from RockAuto Auto Parts And they shipped FAST! :thumbup:
Depending on your country you may just have to do a Google search for the part numbers...that's how I found Rock Auto had them.
Cheers buddy,
I won't be getting them, The want to charge me $34.00 via fed ex to ship to Ireland.
Pretty crappy to be honest.
I was going to get 4 X DORMAN Part # 47356 3 Way F; Diameter A; 3/16"
8 X DORMAN Part # 493021 {#47311} Restrictor;
$11.00 in total.
Shipping $34.00 :(

Cheers
Nelly
 

FIZZER6

The Angry Blue Mantis
Cheers buddy,
I won't be getting them, The want to charge me $34.00 via fed ex to ship to Ireland.
Pretty crappy to be honest.
I was going to get 4 X DORMAN Part # 47356 3 Way F; Diameter A; 3/16"
8 X DORMAN Part # 493021 {#47311} Restrictor;
$11.00 in total.
Shipping $34.00 :(

Cheers
Nelly
Perhaps a European seller carries them? I would just try a Google search for that part number. If not Dorman perhaps another brand sells vacuum fittings in your part of the world?
 

Nelly

International Liaison
Super Moderator
Elite Member
Perhaps a European seller carries them? I would just try a Google search for that part number. If not Dorman perhaps another brand sells vacuum fittings in your part of the world?
Cheers mate,
I can't find any here in Ireland. Weight wise the parts are porbably 2oz and would easily ship in a small packet.
I will continue to search. It's still well worth making your own.
Nelly
 

Pimpson

Junior Member
That came out awesome. It looks almost identical to the one I made. For those of you having trouble finding the connectors, try pet stores. I found all of mine at a pet store in the aquarium supplies section. Instead of 2 "F" connectors, I used a 4 way "+" shaped one.
 

GTPAddict

Just a dude with an FZ6
I made this over the weekend but have not used it yet. I used 1/4 ID tube bought from Lowes for about5.50 a roll (used 2 20' rolls). The outer diameter of the vacuum hose on the bike is about 1/4, and it fits tight inside of the 1/4ID hose I used so I have not used any fittings other then 2 tees to connect the manometer hoses together.

Thanks for the write-up, great pictures and instructions!!!
 

DownrangeFuture

Electronic Repair Genius
Cheers mate,
I can't find any here in Ireland. Weight wise the parts are porbably 2oz and would easily ship in a small packet.
I will continue to search. It's still well worth making your own.
Nelly
That's why I did the two tube setup. It's not 100% exact, but a quick swap of the middle tubes confirms a good sync and it worked out fine for me. :thumbup:
 

FIZZER6

The Angry Blue Mantis
That's why I did the two tube setup. It's not 100% exact, but a quick swap of the middle tubes confirms a good sync and it worked out fine for me. :thumbup:
The vacuum restrictors are a PITA to get in and out of the vacuum tubes on the bike...I would not want to have to swap them...plus when you adjust say, TB #4 it effects all 4 TB's to some degree even though #3 will be most effected. Try the pet store option...there has to be vacuum fitting suppliers where you live.
 

DownrangeFuture

Electronic Repair Genius
The vacuum restrictors are a PITA to get in and out of the vacuum tubes on the bike...I would not want to have to swap them...plus when you adjust say, TB #4 it effects all 4 TB's to some degree even though #3 will be most effected. Try the pet store option...there has to be vacuum fitting suppliers where you live.
Mine are dead on. I could swap them around all day and they'd be even. More even than your sync. And I'm sure there are suppliers in my area. In fact, I found one at autozone on the west side of town, and one south of town, both were about an hour ride for me. And I'm not so afraid of a little math and precision measuring that I felt the ride, or the cost of extra parts+shipping was worth it. I didn't have much trouble getting the hoses in and out either.

At any rate, I was just trying to be helpful to people that may not be able to get the "F" connector. They aren't very common. I couldn't find anything but leaky gang valves at my petshop. And I wanted a larger tube to make the reading and syncing easier.

But yes, you're right, changing one does affect the other three. Unless something is really wrong with your throttle body, once 1 and 2 are synched together, then they should move together. Once 1,2,3 are synced, they should move together as you adjust 4. Either that, or you're not blipping the throttle between adjustments and letting it settle before you adjust things again. That causes the measurement to be skewed on connected type manometers. It's like the zero gets wacked out when you twist the adjustment screws, but you think it's still sitting there.

I'm not an expert or anything, but the truck I learned to drive in was carbureted and I drove that for 4 years, then my first bike was a katana. Carureted. I've been doing it every 1000 miles for most of my driving life. Not to mention I use manometers to ensure the waveguides on my radars stay properly pressurized. As they have to be a quarter atmosphere above current pressure. Differential manometer needed for that, just like a carb.

Heck, if all four carbs were hooked up to isolated tubes with the exact same amount of fluid in them, they would sync just as well. Of course, you'd have to make sure the seal never broke...

Or you could put a precisely weighted piece of metal in each isolated tube and they'd sync the same... Where have I seen that before? :don'tknow:

The tubes don't have to be connected unless you're willing to do a bit of legwork to avoid some math and measuring. So don't knock me just because I'm trying to help someone that can't find the F connectors.
 
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FIZZER6

The Angry Blue Mantis
Mine are dead on. I could swap them around all day and they'd be even. More even than your sync. And I'm sure there are suppliers in my area. In fact, I found one at autozone on the west side of town, and one south of town, both were about an hour ride for me. And I'm not so afraid of a little math and precision measuring that I felt the ride, or the cost of extra parts+shipping was worth it. I didn't have much trouble getting the hoses in and out either.

At any rate, I was just trying to be helpful to people that may not be able to get the "F" connector. They aren't very common. I couldn't find anything but leaky gang valves at my petshop. And I wanted a larger tube to make the reading and syncing easier.

But yes, you're right, changing one does affect the other three. Unless something is really wrong with your throttle body, once 1 and 2 are synched together, then they should move together. Once 1,2,3 are synced, they should move together as you adjust 4. Either that, or you're not blipping the throttle between adjustments and letting it settle before you adjust things again. That causes the measurement to be skewed on connected type manometers. It's like the zero gets wacked out when you twist the adjustment screws, but you think it's still sitting there.

I'm not an expert or anything, but the truck I learned to drive in was carbureted and I drove that for 4 years, then my first bike was a katana. Carureted. I've been doing it every 1000 miles for most of my driving life. Not to mention I use manometers to ensure the waveguides on my radars stay properly pressurized. As they have to be a quarter atmosphere above current pressure. Differential manometer needed for that, just like a carb.

Heck, if all four carbs were hooked up to isolated tubes with the exact same amount of fluid in them, they would sync just as well. Of course, you'd have to make sure the seal never broke...

Or you could put a precisely weighted piece of metal in each isolated tube and they'd sync the same... Where have I seen that before? :don'tknow:

The tubes don't have to be connected unless you're willing to do a bit of legwork to avoid some math and measuring. So don't knock me just because I'm trying to help someone that can't find the F connectors.
I'm not knocking or doubting your method. But if you live in the Continental US...you can order the F-connectors from RockAuto Auto Parts as I did for less than $10 shipped and they arrive in a few days. Remember, we are building our own manometers because we agree it is foolish to spend $125 on one when it's this easy to build! :rockon:

Your method works for you because obviously you are a seasoned pro at this. I think adjusting one bank at a time and going back and forth between them would confuse the newbie.
 
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