Charging problem

pizza_pablo

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Are all SAE connectors, from the battery created equal?
I found an SAE connector coming from under my tank. It measures 12.5v with key off or on and 12.1v with engine running.
Can I just go SAE to USB, then USB to phone with no issues?
Or would it be safer to get an SAE to power /cigarette lighter outlet, in order to use a USB car charger?
rps20200501_190733.jpg
 
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Gary in NJ

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Are you sure about that voltage with the engine running? It should be +14VDC at a minimum. If 12.5VDV is correct for the standing battery, that battery is about to leave you stranded.

That is a charging quick disconnect for the battery. They should be wired directly to the battery terminals so there shouldn’t be any voltage drop. Your phone probably charges at 2.5 to 5VDC. If you send battery voltage direct to the phone you’ll damage the battery (it will probably explode). You can get a DC to DC converter that converts the battery voltage to a USB line voltage. These can be found at an auto parts store or Amazon. The auto parts store will carry the cigarette lighter style. You can disassemble that and mount it in the inner fairing. Amazon or your local motorcycle shop will have a motorcycle specific unit that will mount to the handle bar.
 

pizza_pablo

Site Supporter
Are you sure about that voltage with the engine running? It should be +14VDC at a minimum. If 12.5VDV is correct for the standing battery, that battery is about to leave you stranded.

That is a charging quick disconnect for the battery. They should be wired directly to the battery terminals so there shouldn’t be any voltage drop. Your phone probably charges at 2.5 to 5VDC. If you send battery voltage direct to the phone you’ll damage the battery (it will probably explode). You can get a DC to DC converter that converts the battery voltage to a USB line voltage. These can be found at an auto parts store or Amazon. The auto parts store will carry the cigarette lighter style. You can disassemble that and mount it in the inner fairing. Amazon or your local motorcycle shop will have a motorcycle specific unit that will mount to the handle bar.
Thanks, Gary!
I did check the voltage, twice. It didn't make sense to me, either, that's why I included it.
I would be able to use this SAE connector for both phone charging, with a step down and connecting a battery tender, is that correct?
 

Motogiro

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Are all SAE connectors, from the battery created equal?
I found an SAE connector coming from under my tank. It measures 12.5v with key off or on and 12.1v with engine running.
Can I just go SAE to USB, then USB to phone with no issues?
Or would it be safer to get an SAE to power /cigarette lighter outlet, in order to use a USB car charger?
View attachment 73538
Maybe check your charging system is charging correctly. Even considering you may have a voltage drop because of loss, the static voltage would be lower than the engine running voltage.
You're saying 12.5 vdc static and 12.1 vdc engine running?
 

Motogiro

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Your voltage could be 12.5 static(key off) but after the engine is running you should see voltage go upward indicating the system is charging. Test it again and confirm voltage because with some rpm above idle you should see voltage toward 13 to 14 vdc. If you're seeing voltage below your static voltage with increased rpm it would indicate a charging system failure.
 

pizza_pablo

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Your voltage could be 12.5 static(key off) but after the engine is running you should see voltage go upward indicating the system is charging. Test it again and confirm voltage because with some rpm above idle you should see voltage toward 13 to 14 vdc. If you're seeing voltage below your static voltage with increased rpm it would indicate a charging system failure.
13v at 4000 RPM with low beam headlight.
12.8v at 4000 RPM with high beam headlight.
That's seems high RPM, in order to reach a decent voltage level.
 
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pizza_pablo

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You definitely have charging issues...

Video of my charging system with the BD dual headlight mod(both low beams on):
https://flic.kr/p/LDtUch
Do you think it's likely the battery or the alternator?
The battery is almost 3 years old with 4000 miles.

Also, I may have a headlight out. With low beam selected, the left light is on and the right light is off. With high beam selected, both lights are on and it seems the right is high beam and the left stays on low beam.
 

TownsendsFJR1300

2007 FZ6
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Charge and load test the battery. It's probably fine.

Once the battery is deemed ok, check charging voltages again.

Just to rule out wiring issues, CHECK the charging voltage DIRECT AT THE BATTERY (tank propped up), running and static..


Re the headlight, STOCK, the LEFT LOW BEAM ONLY come on. The RIGHT SIDE does not illuminate UN-LESS the system is modified (as mine is).. Right side (STOCK) comes on only with the high beam light.

**The BD43 mod turns on BOTH headlights with LOW BEAMS ONLY. High beam is right side only**


BTW, the above video, the battery was on it's last legs.



.


.
 

trepetti

It's all good!
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Do you think it's likely the battery or the alternator?
The battery is almost 3 years old with 4000 miles.

Also, I may have a headlight out. With low beam selected, the left light is on and the right light is off. With high beam selected, both lights are on and it seems the right is high beam and the left stays on low beam.
The lighting you mention is normal for a stock FZ6. Many owners (myself included) have made changes to the wiring harness to it be: Left and right low beam, left low bean and right high beam.

I recommend you get the charging issue resolved before making ANY changes to the wiring.

Take your time.....small moves....
 

Motogiro

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Do you think it's likely the battery or the alternator?
The battery is almost 3 years old with 4000 miles.

Also, I may have a headlight out. With low beam selected, the left light is on and the right light is off. With high beam selected, both lights are on and it seems the right is high beam and the left stays on low beam.
I doubt it's anything to do with your battery. It sound like you have a charging problem related to the regulator/rectifier or the stator.
Only one headlight lights on low beam and the other lights on high beam. That's how the bike comes from the factory. There are modifications to get both sides lit.
For now you need to see what's happening with your charging system or you will be stranded.
 

Gary in NJ

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As mentioned, check voltages directly at the battery both running and static. If the voltages are low, we can walk you through a diode test of the Regulator/Rectifyer and if that checks ok you can check the AC output on each of the three legs of the stator. They are easy tests, but unnecessary if the voltage at the battery checks as good.
 

pizza_pablo

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As mentioned, check voltages directly at the battery both running and static. If the voltages are low, we can walk you through a diode test of the Regulator/Rectifyer and if that checks ok you can check the AC output on each of the three legs of the stator. They are easy tests, but unnecessary if the voltage at the battery checks as good.
At the battery terminals
Key Off 12.5v

Idle 13v

2k RPM 13.5v

4k RPM 13.5v

Idle 12.7v

Key Off 12.6v

Idle 12.3v

2k RPM 13v
 

Gary in NJ

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The charging system should make 14VDC at 5000 rpm. I think you need to check your stator. The stator generates 3-phase AC voltage that is then rectified to DC. There are several tests for the stator, but two are very easy and quite telling. First, there should be no continuity between the 3 legs of the stator. Secondly each leg of the stator should produce 60 to 80 VAC at 5000 rpm. Each leg should should be within a few volts of each other. To perform these tests you just need to disconnect the regulator/recifyer from the stator and then perform the tests right through the connector.
 
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Motogiro

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Stator windings resistance should be .22 to .34 ohms at 68f (20c) on each winding. There should be no resistance (open) from any wire on the stator to the stator laminated core/engine ground. AC tests although generally good, with the added resistance test it will help confirm current capability of the windings.
As Gary stated these tests are done with the stator disconnected from the regulator/rectifier.

Also AC voltage at those rates can be harmful or lethal.

Of course most of us tech guys who test 9volt batteries with our tongue in a pinch have probably been preordained and that AC through the heart will probably just result in a burp or a fart... :)
 
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