Hello & Welcome to our community. Is this your first visit? Register

Thanks Thanks:  3
Likes Likes:  1
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Page 1 of 8 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 80
  1. #1
    Nelly (OP)
    International Liaison Loading a bike into a tuck or trailer Nelly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Co Offaly, ROI
    Posts
    8,929
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Blog Entries
    1

    Loading a bike into a tuck or trailer

    I will be taking my bike to a track this year and have read some good advice on this forum about not riding to the track as you will have more energy to enjoy the day.
    I have never put a bike on a trailer or in a van. Some of you have experience in doing this. Please share it with me and if you got any pictures that would be great to.

    Neil
    Last edited by Nelly; 11-27-2011 at 04:51 AM.



    Biker Dude headlight mod
    Speedo Healer
    Lucky Irish Boy foot plates
    K&N air filter
    Heed crash bars with sliders
    External power outlet
    OSO2k set back plates
    Home made Gel seat mod

  2. #2
    ...M Loading a bike into a tuck or trailer grommit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    2,401
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Blog Entries
    1
    Not very helpful but...

    Plumber was doing our bathroom and was there for a few days. I would be playing, sorry working, on me bikes in the garage, I had a small 125 SM style bike I had used to get my bike legs back some years ago. I wanted to get rid of it but had not done anything about it. I mentioned this to the guy in passing, he said that he was interested. So a deal was struck and a discount on the work he was doing obtained.

    So to get it in his van we put a plank of wood up the back of the van onto the bumper I started the bike up and pushed it up the ramp till it got to the bumper and then used the engine power to get over the step while he dragged it in from the van and lent it against his stuff.

    So a plank of wood and brute force then.

  3. Likes Monica A liked this post
  4. #3
    Samurai FZ Soldier Loading a bike into a tuck or trailer reiobard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Hillsborough, NH
    Posts
    7,614
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    just try to load it from a hill to keep the angle of the ramp lower, and for petes sakes don;t stop the bike while it is on it's way up the ramp... if you stop then it is easier to lose balance, also if you can get 2 ramps, one for the bike and one for you to walk up so that you are always on the same level as the bike.

  5. #4
    M em b er e d Fred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    1,790
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here's how I load bikes without any additional help into my 95 Nissan truck. It's a 2wd so it's nice and low to the ground. Some trucks may not be this easy, but that's the fault of the owners for buying the 13" lift kit!

    First, park the truck so that the back wheels are in a ditch or low spot. It'll help a lot.

    Your ramp should have a safety cable that connects to the truck. With the safety cable in place, it should be impossible for you to pull the ramp backwards and have it come off of the tailgate of the truck. This is important, since you'll be using the bike's engine to drive the bike up the ramp. The rear wheel will try and kick the ramp backwards.

    So, with the bike running, stand on the left side of it and put it into 1st gear. Let out the clutch and ride/walk the bike up the ramp.

    You'll have to stop when your knees are about to hit the tailgate. No problem. Pull in the clutch, squeeze the front brakes, and climb up into the truck bed by first putting your knees up on the tailgate, and then standing up.
    Now keep driving the bike forward until it's all the way on the truck.

    As far as tying it down, you want at least four straps holding the bike down. Two in front, two in back.

    Attach the straps to the bike's frame in the back, and to the handlebars or even better, the tripleclamps in the front. With the FZ6 fairing it's a little tricky to get the straps in position where they won't rub the fairing. Try running the right front strap to the left fork tube above the lower tripleclamp, and vice versa for the left strap. Always make sure that your straps are not pinching any wiring. And secure the loose ends of the strap unless you want your paint to take a beating.

    Don't be afraid to crank those straps down. You want to compress the suspension some. Once you're done, the bike should be standing vertically on both wheels, and rocking the bike from side to side should move the entire truck.

    Lastly load the ramp and strap it into place so it won't rattle around and beat up your wheels.

    Have fun at the track!

    Fred
    1990 BMW K75 Turbo (Garrett GT-15 turbocharger. Megasquirt ECU controlling fuel and spark. LC-1 Wideband O2 sensor. Paralever conversion and K1100LT rear wheel. R1100RT front wheel and rotors. K1100RS brakes with custom caliper brackets.)
    2007 Yamaha FZ6 (Stebel Nautilus horn, Valentine 1 hardwired with remote display and audio, Mix-It sound mixer modified for hidden installation, Mayer saddle, true dual high/low headlights. Relay, fuse panel and lockdown blocks for all additional wiring. R6 fork. RyanK fender mounts.)

  6. Thanks upshiftoverdrive thanked for this post
  7. #5
    HavBlue
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Fred View Post
    Here's how I load bikes without any additional help into my 95 Nissan truck. It's a 2wd so it's nice and low to the ground. Some trucks may not be this easy, but that's the fault of the owners for buying the 13" lift kit!

    First, park the truck so that the back wheels are in a ditch or low spot. It'll help a lot.

    Your ramp should have a safety cable that connects to the truck. With the safety cable in place, it should be impossible for you to pull the ramp backwards and have it come off of the tailgate of the truck. This is important, since you'll be using the bike's engine to drive the bike up the ramp. The rear wheel will try and kick the ramp backwards.

    So, with the bike running, stand on the left side of it and put it into 1st gear. Let out the clutch and ride/walk the bike up the ramp.

    You'll have to stop when your knees are about to hit the tailgate. No problem. Pull in the clutch, squeeze the front brakes, and climb up into the truck bed by first putting your knees up on the tailgate, and then standing up.
    Now keep driving the bike forward until it's all the way on the truck.

    As far as tying it down, you want at least four straps holding the bike down. Two in front, two in back.

    Attach the straps to the bike's frame in the back, and to the handlebars or even better, the tripleclamps in the front. With the FZ6 fairing it's a little tricky to get the straps in position where they won't rub the fairing. Try running the right front strap to the left fork tube above the lower tripleclamp, and vice versa for the left strap. Always make sure that your straps are not pinching any wiring. And secure the loose ends of the strap unless you want your paint to take a beating.

    Don't be afraid to crank those straps down. You want to compress the suspension some. Once you're done, the bike should be standing vertically on both wheels, and rocking the bike from side to side should move the entire truck.

    Lastly load the ramp and strap it into place so it won't rattle around and beat up your wheels.

    Have fun at the track!

    Fred
    Dude, ride the bike up the ramp. You can ride it down the street and not vary your line more than 12" so why would you not be able to do the same on a ramp? Anyway you look at it loading a bike while riding is just a controlled crash anyway.

  8. #6
    Former '04 FZ6 Rider DefyInertia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,701
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Fred, good advice.

    HavBlue, if you can't put your feet down at all times, I would not recommend riding it onto the truck. Although I've been tempted, this would not be a good option for me.

    I have a 4x4 tacoma, so the height is more of an issue. I use a very wide 4' x 6' ATV ramp in conjuction with a 6' 2x12 board to load my street bike by myself and without engine power. I can push my dirtbike up on flat ground without the board (db has more clearance too).

    I generally lock the steering column and place the front wheel against the back of the bed and with the bike in gear...it won't go anywhere this way.
    Last edited by DefyInertia; 01-22-2013 at 09:39 PM.

  9. #7
    M em b er e d Fred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    1,790
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HavBlue View Post
    Dude, ride the bike up the ramp. You can ride it down the street and not vary your line more than 12" so why would you not be able to do the same on a ramp?
    Two reasons.
    1. My ramp is only 8" wide.
    2. My balls just aren't that big.

    Fred
    1990 BMW K75 Turbo (Garrett GT-15 turbocharger. Megasquirt ECU controlling fuel and spark. LC-1 Wideband O2 sensor. Paralever conversion and K1100LT rear wheel. R1100RT front wheel and rotors. K1100RS brakes with custom caliper brackets.)
    2007 Yamaha FZ6 (Stebel Nautilus horn, Valentine 1 hardwired with remote display and audio, Mix-It sound mixer modified for hidden installation, Mayer saddle, true dual high/low headlights. Relay, fuse panel and lockdown blocks for all additional wiring. R6 fork. RyanK fender mounts.)

  10. #8
    sportrider
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Fred View Post
    First, park the truck so that the back wheels are in a ditch or low spot. It'll help a lot.

    So, with the bike running, stand on the left side of it and put it into 1st gear. Let out the clutch and ride/walk the bike up the ramp.

    You'll have to stop when your knees are about to hit the tailgate. No problem. Pull in the clutch, squeeze the front brakes, and climb up into the truck bed by first putting your knees up on the tailgate, and then standing up.
    Now keep driving the bike forward until it's all the way on the truck.


    Fred
    +1 that's how I do it

    http://www.600riders.com/forum/how-s...bike-pics.html

    as far as riding it up the ramp: I used to load my dirt bikes like that, but my CR250 only weighed 215lbs. and if I dropped it, it wouldn't do hundreds of dollars in damage. I still use my moto ramp to load the FZ into the truck. it's not rated for that much weight but it has held up good so far.
    another option for getting your bike into the truck is. if you have some buddys(three) handy you can lift it into the truck, I have loaded my bike this way too.
    1. line the bike up with the trucks tailgate as close as you can get it, lift the front end by the botton of the fork legs and the handle bars (one person on each side) put the front tire on the tailgate. have someone get in the truck and stabilize the bike.
    2. lift the tail into the bike, by the swing arm. once you have the tail high enough walk the bike into the truck.
    Last edited by sportrider; 01-13-2008 at 08:47 AM.

  11. #9
    HavBlue
    Guest
    Guys, as mentioned above, it's that balls factor. You may be loading a 2 to 4 hundred pound bike but why is it folks with a 6 to 8 hundred pound bike ride it up the ramp not having the ability to touch the ground and they don't seem to have a problem. Yeah, and that bike they are loading costs 4 times as much as the bikes you are putting in. I know, it's just that Harley riders got no brains right? Maybe not but we apparently have some big balls....... snicker snicker....

  12. #10
    Former '04 FZ6 Rider DefyInertia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,701
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    *rolling my eyes*

    Loading a low and heavy cruiser onto a trailer to go to sturgis is much different than loading a sportbike onto a 4x4 truck after dragging your knee for 250 miles / 8 hours in 90 degree heat.

    I prefer the slow but sure/safe method.
    Last edited by DefyInertia; 01-22-2013 at 09:40 PM.

 

 
Page 1 of 8 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:36 AM.
4.2.5
Image resizer by SevenSkins
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.6.3 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2007 , All content is property of 600Riders.Com All Rights Reserved. The opinions and posts on this site do not neccesarily reflect those of the site owners or operators.
Yamaha FZ6 and Yamaha rights are property of Yamaha Motor Company. 600Riders.com is not associated with Yamaha in any way. We are an enthusiast site dedicated to the Yamaha FZ6 motorcycles. Our goal is to offer a place for Yamaha FZ6 owners to discuss rides, events, mods, maintenance, purchasing, etc
vBulletin Skin By: PurevB.com